October 2012

In Third Degree Films v. Does 1-47 (D. Mass. October 2, 2012), Judge William Young took on the “copyright trolls” in the adult film industry as best he could, holding that the plaintiff (a publisher of copyright-protected adult films that are being shared on the Internet) cannot join 47 “John Doe” defendants in a single action — it must instead file 47 individual suits.

The issue here is part of a larger controversy, the “porn film copyright shakedown.” The way this works is as follows. Copyright holders file Doe suits, which identify defendants only by IP address (all the plaintiff knows at that point). They then subpoena the ISPs and identify the owner of the IP address.  Having identified the owners, they tell them that, absent a quick settlement (typically under $5,000), they will name them in the suit and serve them.  Most people, rather than suffer the embarrassment (or what Judge Young calls the “reputational cost”) of having court records show that they downloaded films with titles like “Big Butt Oil Orgy 2,” settle out-of-court.… Read the full article

Online Agreements - Easy To Get Right, Easy To Get Wrong

It’s easy to create an enforceable online “click-wrap” agreement.  But, as two recent cases remind us, it’s also easy to do it wrong.  Two recent cases are a reminder of this.

In the first case, In re Zappos.com Security Breach Litigation, Zappos was sued in connection with a large data security breach. Responding to the predictable class action lawsuit, Zappos argued that the plaintiffs were required to arbitrate under Zappos’ online user agreement. However, Zappos didn’t have a ‘user agreement,” it only had terms and conditions.  And, it did not require purchasers to “click through” to indicate acceptance of those terms.  The terms, which included the arbitration requirement, were under a link users were not even required to access while making a purchase, much less consent to. Quoting the court:

we cannot conclude that Plaintiffs ever viewed, let alone manifested assent to, the Terms of Use. The Terms of Use is inconspicuous, buried in the middle to bottom of every Zappos.com webpage among many other links, and the website never directs a user to the Terms of Use.

Read the full article