September 2014

Ninth Circuit Hands Oracle a Tough Choice in Oracle v. SAP Copyright Ruling

Oracle faces a tough call following the Ninth Circuit’s August 29, 2014 decision in Oracle Corp. v. SAP AG. Should Oracle accept the $ 356.7 million in copyright damages the Ninth Circuit authorized on appeal, or roll the dice for a new trial, gambling that it can do better?

I’ve written about this case before (see Oracle and SAP Avoid a Retrial, Go Directly to Appeal, in the Other “Tech Trial of the Century”). As I discussed in that September 2012 post, in 2010 Oracle won a record $1.3 billion copyright infringement jury verdict against SAP.  However, the trial judge held that the jury’s “hypothetical-license” damages award was based on undue speculation, and ordered remittitur, reducing the judgment to $272 million, and giving Oracle the choice of accepting that amount or retrying its damages case. Oracle and SAP then entered into a complex stipulation that allowed the parties to avoid an immediate retrial and permitted Oracle to appeal the district court remittitur order.Read the full article

The U.S. Supreme Court IP Year in Review

by Lee Gesmer on September 3, 2014

[As initially published in the September 1, 2014 issue of Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly]

A lot has changed in the realm of intellectual property law following the record-breaking ten intellectual property cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in its 2013 term. Highlights of the six unanimously decided patent cases include suits in which the Court narrowed the scope of patent protection for inventions implemented on computers, made it easier to invalidate a patent for indefiniteness, and made it easier for the district courts to shift attorneys’ fees to prevailing defendants.

The Court issued two copyright decisions, including an important ruling that may have implications for cloud computing. And, one of the Court’s two Lanham Act opinions established a new doctrine for standing in false advertising cases.

Patent

Medtronic v. Mirowski Family Ventures (Jan. 22, 2014) was the first of five decisions overruling the Federal Circuit outright. The Court held that in a declaratory judgment action for non-infringement brought by a patent licensee, the burden of proving infringement lies with the licensor/patent holder, not the licensee. … Read the full article