Litigation

Why Didn't the Blurred Lines Defendants File Rule 50 Motions? (Waiver, again)

You can find plenty of commentary on whether the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled correctly when it upheld a jury verdict that “Blurred Lines” infringed the copyright in “Got To Give It Up.” But another aspect of this decision has received little attention, and that is a mistake made by trial counsel for the Williams/Thicke defendants in this case.

One of the things that keeps lawyers awake at night (or should) is the risk that they will unknowingly waive a client’s legal rights. I wrote about this in 2008 (Traps for the Unwary – Waiver), and again in 2010 (Mister Softee Bitten By Waiver Under FRCP 50 ). In the 2010 post I observed that Microsoft’s failure to move for judgment as a matter of law (“JMOL” in legal jargon) under Rule 50 may have cost it several hundred million dollars.

The bottom line is that lawyers always need to be alert to the risk of a waiver.… Read the full article

93A Opinion in Baker v. Goldman Sachs: What Happens When You Mix In Equal Parts A Start-Up, a Fraudulent Purchaser, a Tech Bubble and a New York Investment Banker?

Earlier this year, on the eve of trial in Baker v. Goldman Sachs in federal district court in Boston, I published a blog post describing the facts behind this unusual case, which involved the acquisition of Dragon Systems by Lernout & Hauspie in a $600 million all-stock deal. Soon after the acquisition closed the market discovered that Lernout had fabricated its Asian sales figures. This was quickly followed by Lernout’s bankruptcy, which left Dragon (owned by the Bakers, husband and wife founders) holding worthless Lernout stock. (Baker v. Goldman Sachs – The Business Deal From Hell).

The acquisition was negotiated and concluded in the first half of 2000, just as the technology bubble was beginning to deflate. nasdaq

After a lengthy trial the jury ruled in favor of Goldman Sachs on all issues except the claim that Goldman violated M.G.L. c. 93A, the Massachusetts statute that makes illegal “unfair or deceptive acts or practices.” Under Massachusetts law, that claim must be decided by the judge.… Read the full article

In Third Degree Films v. Does 1-47 (D. Mass. October 2, 2012), Judge William Young took on the “copyright trolls” in the adult film industry as best he could, holding that the plaintiff (a publisher of copyright-protected adult films that are being shared on the Internet) cannot join 47 “John Doe” defendants in a single action — it must instead file 47 individual suits.

The issue here is part of a larger controversy, the “porn film copyright shakedown.” The way this works is as follows. Copyright holders file Doe suits, which identify defendants only by IP address (all the plaintiff knows at that point). They then subpoena the ISPs and identify the owner of the IP address.  Having identified the owners, they tell them that, absent a quick settlement (typically under $5,000), they will name them in the suit and serve them.  Most people, rather than suffer the embarrassment (or what Judge Young calls the “reputational cost”) of having court records show that they downloaded films with titles like “Big Butt Oil Orgy 2,” settle out-of-court.… Read the full article

The Road Goes on Forever, But the Lawsuits Never End: ConnectU, Facebook, Their Entourages

The ConnectU/Facebook legal saga is truly astounding.  Imagine a mature Oak tree.  Now give the it properties of Kudzu vine (the “vine that ate the South”).  Each branch of this tree is another lawsuit involving ConnectU, Facebook, the principals, and their lawyers.

Now, a new branch has burst forth.  Wayne Chang has sued ConnectU and its lawyers in Superior Court Business Litigation Session in Suffolk County, Boston, claiming that Chang is entitled to as much as 50% of the value of the ConnectU/Facebook settlement (so called, since ConnectU has challenged the finality of the settlement).

You can read about the ConnectU/Facebook saga here, or wait until the movie comes out.

Here is the complaint in the Chang case, and apologies to Robert Earl Keen.

Chang v. Winklevoss Complaint Read the full article