Technology

Hard times, hard times, come again no more.
Many days you have lingered around my cabin door.
Hard times, come again no more.

Hard Times, by Stephen Foster, 1854

_______________________________

Click here to read more about this presentation.

Read the full article

The Google Chrome Comic Book

by Lee Gesmer on September 15, 2008

The release of the Google Chrome web browser on September 2nd attracted a huge amount of publicity. The release of the browser was accompanied by a 38 page comic book, featuring cartoon figures of real-life Google employees, and explaining some of the features and technology associated with the browser. The comic book was illustrated by “cartoon theorist” Scott McLoud.

This is pretty cool stuff – hiring a top cartoonist to help you explain a new software product. Much better than a traditional technical manual!

A link to the comic book on scribd.com is below. (And here is a link to the comic on McLoud’s own web site, which might be easier to read online).

Read this document on Scribd: Google Chrome Comic BookRead the full article

Cloud Computing – The "Next Big Thing"?

by Lee Gesmer on September 4, 2008

Here is a link to the slides used by Dr. Irving Wladawsky-Berger (Chairman Emeritus of the IBM Academy of Technology) in his talk entitled Cloud Computing and the Coming IT Cambrian Explosion. This was presented at Xconomy’s Cloud Computing event in Cambridge in June.

While there is no audio, I think the slides communicate the message loud and clear. A favorite expression of mine is “important if true.” On these predictions, I will say “important if prescient.”

Read the full article

Rambus: Monopolization Redux

by Lee Gesmer on July 22, 2008

Nvidia has filed a Sherman Act complaint against Rambus in federal district court in North Carolina. The allegations appear to echo (copy?) the allegations in the FTC case I reported on recently, where the D.C. Circuit reversed the FTC’s finding of illegal monopolization by Rambus. Can Rambus file a successful motion to dismiss in this new case based on the D.C. Circuit’s decision? Very likely. Why did Nvidia file this suit? My first thought is that Nvidia was concerned about a statute of limitations problem, and this filing (even if dismissed by the District Court) will allow them to appeal and keep their claims alive during the FTC’s motion for en banc review that is pending before the D.C. Circuit, and during a possible Supreme Court appeal by the FTC. Alternatively, they may be hoping that a district court in the Fourth Circuit (or even the Fourth Circuit itself), will see things differently from the D.C.… Read the full article