Trademark

Jarndyce and Jarndyce drones on. This scarecrow of a suit has, in course of time, become so complicated, that no man alive knows what it means. The parties to it understand it least; but it has been observed that no two Chancery lawyers can talk about it for five minutes, without coming to a total disagreement as to all the premises. Innumerable children have been born into the cause; innumerable young people have married into it; innumerable old people have died out of it.  . . . Bleak House, Charles Dickens

We were writing about Lexmark v. Static Control 9 years ago. (2005 article). The case itself dates back to 2002. And, after the Supreme Court decision on March 25, 2014, it is not yet over. Lovers of Bleak House may want to shift their gaze in the direction of this case.

At its outset this case involved allegations of copyright infringement and violation of the DMCA’s anti-circumvention provisions. … Read the full article

Massachusetts Quick Links – October 2012

by Lee Gesmer on November 5, 2012

Oriental Financial Group, Inc. v.  Cooperativa De Ahorro y Crédito Oriental (1st Cir. October 18, 2012) — In this case the First Circuit adopts the trademark law “progressive encroachment doctrine,” joining the 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 11th circuits. The progressive encroachment doctrine may be used as an offensive countermeasure to the affirmative defense of laches (delay in brining suit) where the trademark owner can show that “(1) during the period of the delay the plaintiff could reasonably conclude that it should not bring suit to challenge the allegedly infringing activity; (2) the defendant materially altered its infringing activities; and (3) suit was not unreasonably delayed after the alteration in infringing activity” (quoting Oriental Financial).

Harlan Laboratories, Inc. v. Gerald Campbell (D. Mass. October 25, 2012) — Applying Indiana law, Judge Patti Saris issues a preliminary injunction enforcing a one year non-compete agreement. However, the opinion makes liberal use of Massachusetts and First Circuit precedents.… Read the full article

Yes, You Can Trademark the Color Red (on the sole of a shoe)

One of the thorniest issues in trademark law is whether and when trademark law will protect the use of a single color. After all, there are an infinite number of colors, and it would hardly be fair if one company could obtain a theoretically perpetual right to exclude others from using a color. So, the law makes it difficult to achieve this.

Cases involving color marks are rare, but the Second Circuit released an important decision last week in Christian Louboutin S.A. v. Yves Saint Laurent Am., Inc., (2nd Cir. 2012). The court held that Louboutin’s trademark, consisting of a red, lacquered outsole on a high fashion woman’s shoe (the “Red Sole Mark”), has acquired limited “secondary meaning” as a distinctive symbol that identifies the Louboutin brand, but (oddly) only where the red outsole contrasts with the color of the remainder of the shoe.

The heart of the decision is the court’s functionality analysis.… Read the full article

Slides From Copyright/Trademark CLE

by Lee Gesmer on April 27, 2012

I’ve posted the slides from a CLE talk I gave on Wednesday, April 25th.  Hopefully, the  slides are informative standing alone.  They address the very recent DMCA decisions by the 9th Circuit (Veoh) and 2nd Circuit (Youtube), the copyright “first sale” doctrine as applied to digital files in the Redigi case pending in SDNY, and recent trademark “keyword advertising” cases decided in the 4th and 9th Circuits (Rosetta Stone in the 4th Circuit, Network Automation and Louis Vuitton in the 9th).  There are also some slides devoted to the CFAA, including the 9th Circuit’s en banc decision in the Nosal case.

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Copyright and Trademark Issues on the InternetRead the full article